Thursday, January 10, 2013

What is inside the Monas? - Jakarta - Indonesia

The National Monument (Indonesian: Monumen Nasional (Monas)) is a 433 ft (132 metre) tower in the centre of Merdeka Square, Central Jakarta, symbolizing the fight for Indonesia. Construction began in 1961 under the direction of President Sukarno. Monas was opened to the public in 1975. It is topped by a flame covered with gold foil. The monument and the museum are open daily from 08.00 - 15.00 Western Indonesia Time (UTC+7) throughout the week except for the last Monday of each month when the monument is closed.



Monument design
The towering monument encapsulates the philosophy of Lingga and Yoni. Lingga resembles an alu rice pestle and Yoni resembles a lesung rice mortar, two important traditional Indonesian tools. Lingga and Yoni also symbolize eternal life with the lingga phallic symbol, representing masculinity, positive elements, and daytime and the Yoni the female organs symbol, representing femininity, negative elements, and night. The monument consists of a 117.7m obelisk on a 45m square platform at a height of 17m, the goblet yard. The obelisk itself is clad with Italian marble.

The northern pond measuring 25×25 m was designed to cool water for the air conditioning system of Monas as well as to enhance the beauty of the surrounding area. To the north, there is a statue of Indonesia national hero Prince Diponegoro by Italian sculptor Cobertaldo.

The National History MuseumThe Indonesian National History Museum has a display of dioramas in the large marble-lined hall below Monas. There are a total of 51 dioramas around the walls and in the centre of the hall. The dioramas first show scenes from Indonesian history beginning from the earliest days of colonialism and the Srivijaya and Majapahit eras followed events from the period of European colonialization and uprisings against Dutch East Indies rule.

The dioramas continue well into the 20th century showing the Japanese occupation, the proclamation of Indonesian independence in 1945, the struggle for independence of Indonesian revolution, and on to events during the New Order era of Suharto's regime.


The entrance to Monas is located around 100 meters away to the northern side of the monument. Visitors enter by steps down to a tunnel which leads back towards the base of the Monas. There is a ticket office (Rp 2,500 for adults, mid 2012) at the end of the tunnel. Tickets allow access to the National History Museum display of dioramas as well as several other parts of the area. Tickets for access to the observation desk cost another Rp 7,500 for adults (mid 2012) and may be purchased at a second booth after passing through the hall showing the diorama display.

It is best to go early, preferably arriving before 08.00am, and proceed directly to the lift to the observation tower. The lift has a capacity of perhaps 160 people per hour so long queues build up quickly. The other parts of the monument, including the dioramas in the hall below the Monas, can be viewed later.

For Jakarta residents, Monas means an affordable recreation. they are not going to inside Monas, but just play at park. Families can bring their children to play there. Jakarta has very few open places for people. We can see there many sellers toys and snacks for kids there, especially at weekend and holiday.



In celebration of New Year's Eve here, everyone went to Monas to see the fireworks and musical performances. It was greeted with great fanfare, the roar of trumpets and fireworks glide never seems to stop in an instant, always filled the sky.


Photo Credit: KOMPAS IMAGES/DHONI SETIAWAN

reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Monument_(Indonesia)

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